Married Young

by Kaylon Jackson and Victoria Holloway

Kenzie and Brandon Brinkley dated for seven months, were engaged for four months, and got married on August 22, 2015.

Before they got married, Brandon, 20, was a sophomore international business major at Texas Tech and Kenzie, 22, was a recent graduate of Texas Tech.

Kenzie and Brandon sitting in their living room.

Kenzie and Brandon sitting in their living room.

The couple met at Redeemer church taking care of 2-year-olds in the nursery.

Brandon said he decided in high school he did not want to start dating until he was ready to get married. So when he and Kenzie started dating, he meant business.

Kenzie washing the dishes and Brandon drying the dishes. Kenzie said Brandon has served her in the busyness of graduate school by cooking and doing chores.

Kenzie washing the dishes and Brandon drying the dishes. Kenzie said Brandon has served her in the busyness of graduate school by cooking and doing chores.

“It was one of those questions of ‘Why wait? Why put it off two more years or one more year if this is really what we want?’” Brandon said. “So we decided that we would get married young and spend the rest of our lives together.”

When the couple was engaged, they said the financial responsibilities were their main concern of getting married young. Brandon said the greatest benefit of being married is that Kenzie loves him even with his flaws.

“I know that I’m messed up, but I know that Kenzie is going to love me despite those things and vis versa, so that’s really sweet,” Brandon said.

The Brinkleys in their kitchen.

The Brinkleys in their kitchen.

After Tech dropped international business as a major, Brandon decided to take a break from school and is currently a full-time intern at Redeemer Church, where he and Kenzie met.

Kenzie graduated from Tech in May and is now a first-year physical therapy student at the Texas Tech Health Sciences Center.

She said she did not want to be naïve about the financial responsibilities of marriage, but even considering the possible difficulties, they saw being married to each other as worth it.

Since the couple has been married, Kenzie said the primary challenge she faces is balancing time between studying and being with Brandon.

As a married student, Kenzie said balancing time between studying and being with Brandon is one of the biggest challenges.

As a married student, Kenzie said balancing time between studying and being with Brandon is one of the biggest challenges.

However, she said he provides stability and encouragement that helps her through the hardships of graduate school.

“He’s really been here to serve me, and that’s been a big help while I’ve been in school,” Kenzie said. “He’s helped with cooking and meals and things on the side.”

Through the first two months of marriage, the couple said they have learned a lot and grown as individuals and together.

“(Marriage) takes a lot of sacrifice and selflessness,” Kenzie said. “To make a marriage work is a lot of saying sorry and being willing to admit that I was actually wrong about something and talk through it and communicate.”

Despite some challenges with getting married young, the couple said it has been worth it.

Despite some challenges with getting married young, the couple said it has been worth it.

 

Jason Whiting, Ph.D., speaks on being married young. Whiting is an associate professor in the Marriage and Family Therapy department. He has been at Tech for eight years.

Gold Stripe Coffee Roasting Brothers

Two brothers, Zach and Zane Montandon, have teamed up as business partners in the Gold Stripe Coffee Roasters company. They are roasting out of a small room in the back of the Skate Ranch, which is owned by Zach’s father-in-law. The Montandon brothers hope to provide fresher, higher quality coffee beans to local coffee shops in Lubbock.

The Past and Present of Miss Black Texas Tech

The Miss Black TTU pageant was started in the 1970s by the Black Student Association when black students were not allowed to participate in Texas Tech’s homecoming pageant. The organization brought back the pageant this year to bring the black community together and celebrate diversity at the university. The winner of the pageant received a $1,000 scholarship and the runner up received a $500 scholarship. The winner will represent the black community at Texas Tech and be a part of the Tech homecoming pageant next school year.

Gay Men and 1950s Women’s Films

New York Artist and Tech Alumnus Features His Art Exhibition

By Victoria Holloway

Philip Monaghan, who graduated from Texas Tech’s School of Art in 1976, reunites with former professors and colleagues as he presents his collection titled “Why Are You Doing This To Me?” Monaghan’s paintings reflect a poem called the “The Late Show” by David Trinidad. Together, Monaghan and Trinidad portray the lives and challenges of gay men through poetry, paintings, and a film series. Their art creatively depicts the relationship between gay men’s experiences and 1950s women’s films.

 

The reception for Texas Tech alumnus Philip Monaghan's art exhibit titled "Why Are You Doing This To Me?" was on Oct. 2 at the School of Art.

The reception for Texas Tech alumnus Philip Monaghan’s art exhibit titled “Why Are You Doing This To Me?” was on Oct. 2 at the School of Art.

 

People gather in the Landmark Gallery to view Monaghan's art.

People gather in the Landmark Gallery to view Monaghan’s art.

 

Communications design major Austin Laughlin (back to camera in focus) is a freshman in the School of Art. He said he was excited to see the exhibit because Monaghan gave a presentation in one of his classes.

Communications design major Austin Laughlin (with his back to the camera) is a freshman in the School of Art. He said he was excited to see the exhibit because Monaghan gave a presentation in one of his classes.

 

Artist Philip Monaghan and poet David Trinidad collaborated their ideas to create the exhibit.

Artist Philip Monaghan and poet David Trinidad collaborated their ideas to create the exhibit.

 

Trinidad's poem "The Late Show" references films that are visually represented in Monaghan's paintings. Monaghan's paintings give insight and deeper meaning to Trinidad's poem.

Trinidad’s poem “The Late Show” references films that are visually represented in Monaghan’s paintings. Monaghan’s paintings give insight and deeper meaning to Trinidad’s poem.

 

Monaghan, who is pointing to his art in the background, said the 1950s women's movies displayed in the art allowed gay men to relate to the experiences these women had.

Monaghan, who is pointing to his art in the background, said the 1950s women’s movies displayed in the art allowed gay men to relate to the experiences these women had.

 

The artist said the movies have many gay undertones and scenes that represent struggles in gay men's lives.

The artist said the movies have many gay undertones and scenes that represent struggles in gay men’s lives.

 

"Gay men used to watch these women's movies before there was gay media because they could relate to them," Monaghan said. The artist (middle) is explaining his "Why Are You Doing This To Me?" exhibit to two viewers.

“Gay men used to watch these women’s movies before there was gay media because they could relate to them,” Monaghan said. The artist (middle) is explaining his “Why Are You Doing This To Me?” exhibit to two viewers.

 

Monaghan's mentor, Jim Howze (second to left in the wheelchair), who is a retired professor from the Texas Tech School of Art, came to see his pupil's art. The catalog, which describes the art collection and individual pieces of art, is dedicated to Jim Howze. Howze is pictured next to his wife (to the left of him) and surrounded by his former students.

Monaghan’s mentor, Jim Howze (second to left in the wheelchair), who is a retired professor from the Texas Tech School of Art, came to see his pupil’s work. The catalog, which describes the art collection and individual pieces of art, is dedicated to Jim Howze. Howze is pictured next to his wife (to the left of him) and surrounded by his former students.

 

Howze was also the mentor of Linda Fawcett (first on the left) who attended the Tech art school with Monaghan. "(Professor Howze) straightened me out," Fawcett said.

Howze was also the mentor of Linda Fawcett (first on the left) who attended the Tech art school with Monaghan. “(Professor Howze) straightened me out,” Fawcett said.

 

The film series included in the "Why Are You Doing This To Me?" artistic collection will be showing at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema from Oct. 19 to Nov. 15.

The film series included in the “Why Are You Doing This To Me?” artistic collection will be showing at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema from Oct. 19 to Nov. 15.

 

After graduating from Tech, Monaghan attended Pratt in 1979 and has since had much success and achievements as a freelance artist in New York.

After graduating from Tech, Monaghan attended Pratt in 1979 and has since had great success as a freelance artist in New York.

 

The exhibit shown in the Landmark Gallery at the School of Art will be on display until Dec. 13.

The exhibit shown in the Landmark Gallery at the School of Art will be on display until Dec. 13.

The Heart is the “Breath of Life” by Victoria Holloway